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‘World’s Best-Known Scientific Journal’ Is Looking for an Intern — but Only if Their Skin’s a Certain Color

There was a time in America — a rather long time — when the most open-minded thing a person could do was not see color.

These days, it appears “open” and “closed” have traded places.

According to the Left side of the cultural aisle, the enlightened among us notice shades of skin — and proceed accordingly.

The message is being made increasingly clear, in various sectors of society.

And — so far as I can tell — we're being told not only to see others by their race, but ourselves.

That's how we wind up with stories such as these:

Speaking of “included,” the word looks to have taken on a curious trait.

These days, inclusion seems to involve…exclusion.

Hence, London-based Nature Magazine is looking for a summer intern.

It made the announcement by way of a tweet:

“As part of our commitment to foster diversity and inclusion, we are looking for a Black candidate with a passion for science communication based in the UK for a full-time, paid news internship.”

Those interested can fill out the online form.

According to the application, Nature's looking exclusively for someone with dark skin — 'cause of inclusion:

As part of our commitment to foster diversity and inclusion, Nature is recruiting for a new internship in its news team. We are looking for a Black candidate with a passion for science communication, to join a friendly and dynamic team at the world's best-known scientific journal.

The position is a paid, full-time training and development opportunity open to anyone of Black heritage, which includes those who identify as Black, African, Caribbean, Black British or Mixed/Multiple ethnic groups.

Being inclusive's nothing new for the company.

Such is made evident on its site:

Diversity Commitment

Nature Portfolio is committed to promoting practices that support diversity and inclusion in science communication and publishing. We recognize that there are many dimensions to diversity, including gender, race/ethnicity, geography and career stage.

As a guiding principle, we aim to foster equity, diversity and inclusion within our internal practices and in published content, embody these values in all our editorial activities and to support and promote these values in the research community.

The company promises diversity in the areas of commissioned authors, peer reviewers, editorial board members, reporting, nature conferences, and language and imagery.

And those worried about sexism should fret not.

As for nature conferences, the magazine “commits to a ‘no men-only' policy for conference organizing committees, for speaker invitations, short poster presentations and for panels.”

Nature Conferences has developed a Code of Conduct and Diversity Policy which will form part of our contract with partners and others to help all meet the goals of the “no men-only” policy. Participants of a Nature Conference will be required to agree to abide by the Code of Conduct at registration. Nature Conferences commit to annual monitoring and reporting on progress against this commitments.

Concerning race, of course, Nature's not the only one keeping track.

Earlier this month, Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot said she'd only be granting one-on-one interviews to press people who aren't white:

“By now, you may have heard the news that on the occasion of the two-year anniversary of my inauguration as Mayor of this great City, I will be exclusively providing one-on-one interviews with journalists of color.”

As for Nature's ad, social media wasn't solely supportive:

So goes society.

For the moment, it's the nature of Western culture.

And it's the nature…of Nature.

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